Swansea Museum

The world’s first industrial nation

The National Waterfront Museum in Swansea tells the story of Welsh industry and innovation over the past 300 years when Wales can lay claim to being the world’s first industrial nation. By the late 19th century, South Wales was internationally recognised as a centre for heavy industry, coal production and maritime trade and the National…

Copper mining on the Great Orme

Uncovered in 1987 during a scheme to landscape an area of Llandudno’s Great Orme, the Copper Mine is the largest Bronze Age example of its kind in the world. Excavated more than 3,500 years ago by miners using nothing more than stone and bone tools, the cavern gives visitors a feel for the harsh conditions…

Scenic route to the Great Orme summit

Perched on top of Llandudno’s Great Orme is a Summit Complex that offers striking views of Anglesey, the Irish Sea and areas of the Snowdonia National Park. The complex, at 679ft up, was first erected in 1909 as a golf clubhouse but underwent many incarnations before becoming one of the area’s most popular tourist destinations.…

Dolforwyn Castle

Last challenge to English rule

Dolforwyn Castle stands on a wooded hill overlooking the Severn valley, a scene so peaceful today it is hard to imagine it once being the centre of military conquest. But the Severn valley forms a natural route into Wales and the significance of the river crossing at Rhyd Chwima, near Montgomery, was not lost on…

Pwll Penarth

Wetland transformed for wildlife

Once part of the sewage farm next door, Pwll Penarth is now a wetland nature reserve managed by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust. Located between a bend in the river and the derelict Montgomery Canal the site is maintained in partnership with Severn Trent Water and was remodelled in 1996. Islands and special gravel ‘cliffs’ were…

Llandegfedd Reservoir

Peace and quiet at Llandegfedd

A 434-acre site set in the rolling hills of south-east Wales, between Usk and Pontypool, Llandegfedd Reservoir Country Park is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. A world away from the frantic pace of modern life, there are two miles of footpaths around the reservoir to enjoy, as well as opportunities for angling and sailing.…

Tintern Abbey

The remains of Cistercian hard labour

Situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, Tintern Abbey is a site of outstanding beauty on the Welsh bank of the River Wye that welcomes about 70,000 visitors every year. Founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, in 1131 it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in…

Pontcysyllte

The world’s highest aqueduct

Built by architects Thomas Telford and William Jessop in 1805, Pontcysyllte’s cast-iron aqueduct stands on 18 pillars at a height of 30 metres above the River Dee. Located on the Welsh-English border near the 18th century-road crossing at Pont Cysylltau, it is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal across the river in north-east…

The Snowdon Mountain Railway

At 1085m Mount Snowdon dominates the landscape of the Snowdonia National Park and the most comfortable way to reach the summit is via the Snowdon Mountain Railway. With stunning scenery and awe-inspiring views , visitors have been travelling to Llanberis since 1896 to experience the unique journey to the summit. From the moment the train…